The Museum of Bread, School, and Other Curiosities

Last Friday we had some time, so we decided to visit a museum we saw advertized on one of our jaunts to Tarnowskie Gory.  It was a unique museum of household curiosities (and some really were curiosities!) from the past centuries.  Bread as the staple of life was stressed throughout the tour.  This museum is extremely conducive to students from schools around this area, we imagine that during the school year, there are numerous classrooms of students enjoying this tour.  A father and son own and operate this establishment, and they all seem to enjoy running their unique offering to the public.

The is the man who started this family-owned museum, and he serves as the guide for the tours.  He has collected everything you could possibly think of in the way of antique "curiosities" used in homes in years past.  It is quite apparent that he loves what he is doing and is proud of all the things he has collected throughout the years to make his museum very unique.  He made sure we understood everything he was explaining to the group.  This is the machine that made buki (rolls).

The is the man who started this family-owned museum, and he serves as the guide for the tours. He has collected everything you could possibly imagine in the way of antique “curiosities” used in homes in years past. It is quite apparent that he loves what he is doing and is proud of all the things he has collected throughout the years to make his museum very unique. He made sure we understood everything he was explaining to the group. This is the machine that made buki (rolls).

The old time kitchen equipment was fascinating.

The old time kitchen equipment was fascinating.

One of the rooms in the museum was a historic schoolroom.  He had a great time showing the children in our group how the students were disciplined and some of the clothing they wore years ago.

One of the rooms in the museum was a historic schoolroom. He had a great time showing the children in our group how the students were disciplined and some of the clothing they wore years ago.

In this room our guide gave a lecture about bread being such a staple in our lives.  When he speaks to a classroom of children, he stresses the importance of never throwing away bread because so many people in previous years in their country would have given anything for just a piece of bread.

In this room our guide gave a lecture about bread being such a staple in our lives. When he speaks to a classroom of children, he stresses the importance of never throwing away bread because so many people in previous years in their country would have given anything for just a piece of bread.  During the tours for the children, they each make their own little piece of bread, sculpted any way they want it to look.

He again stressed the importance of bread in our lives as he talked about this picture from the early 1900's which shows thousands of people in bread lines.  The modern day Polish children have no concept of what it must have been like to have been in this line of hungry men, women, and children.  We Americans really have no concept of this either.

He again stressed the importance of bread in our lives as he talked about this picture from the early 1900′s which shows thousands of people in bread lines. The modern day Polish children have no concept of what it must have been like to have been in this line of hungry men, women, and children. We Americans really have no concept of this either.  The Polish people have been through so many difficult times in the country’s history.

The tour was in Polish, but we found a doctor in our group who had spent some time at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, so he helped us out when we were in the dark as to language.  The tour was most interesting, and we were glad we had some time to visit this unique museum.

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